“Civil rights” and total war

William Grigg, who is generally amazing, is particularly so here.

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3 Responses to “Civil rights” and total war

  1. kishnevi says:

    Yes, “amazing” is one possible word. Although I’m not sure it would be complimentary in this instance.

    Reading it I have the distinct impression that Grigg would be quite happy if segregation, or even slavery, were still alive and well in the South. Jim Crow and the KKK were not really blowback: they were concerted attempts by whites to keep blacks “in their place”. And just how does Mr. Grigg think slavery should have been ended and segregation gotten rid of in an area where the “planter class” was determined to make them last?

  2. jeffreyquick says:

    The difficulty with a propertarian critique of civil rights law is that the law seeks to remedy a violation of property rights. Ownership of people was always illegitimate as it contradicted their self-ownership, but while it was recognized by law, people exchanged real legitimate property for slaves. somebody was going to be left holding the bag. Actually, freeing slaves is one of the few cases where I’d be prepared to argue for eminent domain, as being the least worst solution.

    Apparently Grigg is willing to live with the risk of being discriminated against, in exchange for property and association rights.

  3. kishnevi says:

    Apparently Grigg is willing to live with the risk of being discriminated against, in exchange for property and association rights

    And so am I. Cf. Beck at the Elbo Room.

    But the feeling I got from Grigg’s article is that Grigg thought slavery and Jim Crow laws were less offensive than the idea that government can intervene to end them, and that we should have just, I don’t know? prayed that the Holy Spirit inspire all those slaveholders to free their slaves?

    God willing, I’m just misjudging Grigg.

    BTW, I don’t remember details, but I think some of the Northern states (New York? Connecticut?) used a version of eminent domain to free the slaves in their jurisdictions in the first part of the 19th century.

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